Performance-Based Engineering To Urban Resilience

Advancements in the performance-based earthquake engineering framework provide rigorous probabilistic descriptions of seismic performance, using metrics such as economic losses, fatality estimates and downtime. More recently, the concept of seismic resilience has been emphasized, focusing on the role that buildings play in ensuring that communities, particularly urban centers, can minimize the effect of, adapt to and recover from earthquakes. A key aspect of assessing resilience is establishing a link between building performance and the post-event functionality and recovery of a community. Limit states such as functional loss, damage that renders a building unsafe to occupy or irreparable, which (by comparison) have received much less attention in past research, play a central role in evaluating resilience. The ability to quantify factors that affect downtime, business interruption, and restoration of functionality is also relevant.

This presentation will explore challenges to utilizing performance-based engineering as a tool to address specific aspects of resilience and evaluate policies that are intended to enhance community resilience. A framework for incorporating probabilistic building performance limit states in the assessment of community resilience to earthquakes will be presented. The limit states are defined on the basis of their implications to post-earthquake functionality and recovery. We will demonstrate how the framework can be applied to model the post-earthquake recovery of the shelter-in-place housing capacity of an inventory of residential buildings in order to inform planning and policy decisions, similar to those described in the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association Resilient City Initiative, to manage the earthquake risk to the residential housing capacity of communities. A novel approach to probabilistically assessing post-earthquake structural safety and the limit state defined by damage that renders a building unsafe to occupy will also be introduced. The methodology integrates key elements from previously published guidelines including component-level damage simulation, virtual inspection and structural collapse performance assessment. Strategies for enhancing the resilience of tall buildings will also be discussed and the results of a case study of an archetypal 42-story concrete shear wall building located in San Francisco will be highlighted. Finally, current efforts towards the development of resilience-based performance standards for buildings and lifeline systems will be presented.

Date Thursday, October 20th 2016

Time 5:30 – 7:00 (5:30 Networking; 6:00 Program)

Location Arup Offices — 560 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94105

RSVP chapterinfo@eerinc.org to reserve a seat.

Prof. Greg Deierlein, Civil and Environmental EngineeringDr. Greg Deierlein is the John A. Blume Professor of Engineering in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford University where he directs the Blume Earthquake Engineering Center. He holds a doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin, a master of science from the University of California at Berkeley, and a bachelor of science from Cornell University. Greg previously served as the deputy director for the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center where he led the research planning to develop performance-based approaches and technologies in earthquake engineering.  Deierlein specializes in the design and behavior of steel, concrete and composite structures, nonlinear structural analysis, computational fracture and damage mechanics, and performance-based earthquake engineering. He is a registered professional engineer and maintains professional activities as a structural engineering consultant, design peer reviewer, and participant in national technical and building code standards committees.  In 2013, he was elected to the US National Academy of Engineering for his contributions to applying nonlinear analysis in structural design.

 

henryburtonheadshotDr. Henry V. Burton is an Assistant Professor and the Englekirk Presidential Chair in Structural Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research is directed towards understanding and modeling the relationship between the performance of infrastructure systems within the built environment, and the ability of communities to minimize the extent of socioeconomic disruption following extreme events such as major earthquakes. Dr. Burton is a registered structural engineer in the state of California. Prior to obtaining his PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University, he spent six years in practice at Degenkolb Engineers, where he worked on numerous large scale projects involving design of new buildings and seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing buildings. Current projects include (1) utilizing remote sensing to assess the implication of tall building performance on the resilience of urban centers, (2) stochastic characterization of building aftershock collapse risk and (3) developing design and assessment methods for resilient and sustainable buildings. Henry is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Next Generation of Disaster Researchers Fellowship (2014) and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2016).

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