October 17 Chapter Meeting

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Join your Chapter Colleagues and the Stanford University EERI Student Chapter for a joint meeting with two presentations about ongoing research at Stanford.

Time: 5:30-7:30pm
Where: Y2E2, Room 300 (Karl Knapp Conference Room), 473 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (Directions)
RSVP: chapterinfo@eerinc.org by Monday October 15th

Topics:

Seismically Isolated Unibody Residential Buildings for Enhanced Life-Cycle Performance

Rapid Post-earthquake Damage Assessment Using Combined Remote-sensing and Limited Field-based Damage Data

Speakers:

Prof. Eduardo Miranda
Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University
Mr. Scott Swensen
PhD Candidate
Mr. David Lallemant
PhD Candidate

Abstracts:

Seismically Isolated Unibody Residential Buildings for Enhanced Life-Cycle Performance – Expensive architectural components that are common in light-frame buildings such as cladding and partition wall finishes are vulnerable to damage at very small drift levels. While engineering practice has moved toward providing increased structural ductility in exchange for reducing strength, this approach makes less sense for light residential construction where added strength is inexpensive and damage produced by small deformations can be costly. A new strategy is proposed to minimize earthquake damage to low-rise, light-frame residential buildings.  One part of the strategy is to increase to lateral strength and stiffness in a cost-effective manner by enhancing the lateral strength and stiffness of architectural walls and ceilings.  The second part of the strategy is to develop a low-cost sliding base isolation system that is rugged and inexpensive to build and maintain.  The isolation system is tailored for use with light-frame buildings that have significant lateral strength.  Results of preliminary tests and analyses will be discussed, along with future plans that involve shake table testing of full-scale building.

Rapid Post-earthquake Damage Assessment Using Combined Remote-sensing and Limited Field-based Damage Data – Remote-sensing based post-disaster damage assessment has become a standard method for rapid loss assessment following major catastrophes. The use of satellite and aerial imagery indeed has the advantage of providing results very rapidly and at low cost, particularly when covering large or inaccessible areas. However, remote-sensing based assessments are limited in their ability to identify levels of damage lower than complete or near collapse. This is problematic when a significant portion of losses (indeed often the majority of losses) comes from buildings and infrastructure having suffered heavy to moderate damage but not collapse, and so are difficult to identify from bird’s-eye view. Current methods to extrapolate from collapse rate to lower damage states show large variability and error. Based on data from remote-sensing and field-based evaluations in post-earthquake Haiti, this presentation provides preliminary research for a novel way to estimate the distribution of every damage state based on the combination of remote-sensing based collapse identification and limited field-based assessment data. This method is used to assess losses at a macro scale, but also at the neighborhood or sub-neighborhood scale, in order to better guide response, recovery and reconstruction plans.

Register today at:

chapterinfo@eerinc.org

EERI Northern California Chapter | c/o EERI National | 499 14th Street Suite 320 | Oakland, CA 94612-1934 USA | chapterinfo@eerinc.org